spring

From asparagus to ramps to rhubarb, our Real Food Right Now series celebrates the best fresh spring foods just as Mother Nature delivers them!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Fiddleheads

Beautiful fiddleheads are bright green, their tightly coiled heads delicately curled like the scroll of a violin. With a flavor slightly reminiscent of asparagus, but also nutty and pleasantly bitter, fiddleheads are a delicious reminder that the doldrums of winter are finally over.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Wine

Are you ready to step up your wine game? In this Real Food overview, we'll touch on some familiar grapes and wines while providing references for further exploration. Most importantly, we'll look at the environmental impacts and sustainable potential of winemaking!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Fava Beans

Favas are a fleeting spring vegetable - like ramps and sorrel and morels -that show up at the market and quickly disappear. Enjoyed in cuisines worldwide, favas are much lauded subjects of folklore and even show up in one of the most notorious lines in American cinema. Mull over more fascinating fava facts and pro tips in this week's Real Food Right Now!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Snow Peas and Sugar Snaps

Snow peas and sugar snaps - is there a better snack to (healthily) satisfy what seems like a basic human need for crunchy foods? Their sweet, green pea-taste and super crisp texture are mighty fine on their own. Of course, they also taste great when tossed into a stir-fry, added to a salad or pickled in brine!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Radishes

Is there anything better than a delightfully crunchy radish? Even better: every part of the radish is edible, from the root to the leaves to the seed pods. Read on for all you ever wanted to know about this incredibly delicious vegetable.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Chives

If ramps can become an overnight produce sensation, why not chives? Chives are the next best mild onion-y thing -- and super easy to grow on your own. On top of that, you can enjoy chives well into the summer, when ramps will be a distant memory.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Mint

Good chefs know that mint freshens up so much more than chewing gum, from salads and lamb to ice cream and pies; good gardeners know better than to let its wandering runners take over!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Emmer (Farro)

This week's real food is one of the world's most ancient grains. Nearly lost as industry flooded markets with grains that were easier to process, farro -- or emmer -- is making a comeback. A chewy, nutty comeback.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Mushrooms

Although the joys of cooking and snacking on the mighty mushroom are ancient, we still have much to discover when it comes to these tasty fungi. From hunting mushrooms in the forest to serving them up at the table, mushrooms offer an endless adventure!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Eggs

Whether the chicken or the egg came first, eggs probably win the "most versatile ingredient" competition hands down. Found in everything from sauces and custards to their own headlining items, like omelets and egg nog, eggs offer up "egg-cellent" dining entertainment from dawn to dusk.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Quinoa

The well-stocked pantry of the modern age would do well to include quinoa, seed extraordinaire. A complete protein all its own packed with nutritional goodness, quinoa shows off its multi-talents from breakfast to dinner, a highly versatile ingredient on the plates of meat-eaters and vegetarians alike.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Potatoes

With over 4,000 varieties, the potato is a staple in cuisines around the world. It was also among the first vegetables to be intensively monocropped and served as a model for other crops. The common tuber is more exotic than you think!

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Garlic

Long before it became a culinary star, this week's real food was used foremost as medicine and considered a panacea for sundry ailments, from impotence to smallpox, parasites to poor digestion. Here, the condensed history of the so-called stinking rose, and a wealth of cooking tips. Garlic lovers, this one's for you.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Dandelions

This Real Food's English name comes from the French dent de lion ("lion's tooth"), likely owing to its tooth-like serrated leaves. Dandelion greens are at their best in the spring to very early summer, before the flowers begin to bloom, while the yellow flowers can be harvested throughout the summer and into early fall.

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