• Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Dill

    When most Americans think of dill, pickles come to mind, but the herb was once prized by the ancient Greeks and Romans for its health benefits and magical properties. A staple in the cuisines of Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, North Africa and Russia, dill is actually an incredibly functional, versatile herb and one of the most nutrient dense, low-calorie foods you can eat.

  • Taste it, Don't Waste it! Fresh Herbs

    Want to take your dinner from glum to glam? Add fresh herbs. There is nothing like a tablespoon or two of fragrant greenery to brighten any dish. But what's a cook to do with the rest of the bunch? And what about those stems? Should you chop or toss? Enjoy every last bite of your transformative herbs.

  • Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Ramps

    The humble ramp (aka the wild leek, aka ramson) has enjoyed a cult-like following for decades. Their fleeting appearance around the spring equinox sends people into a tizzy and is cause for online alerts when they arrive at New York City's Union Square Greenmarket. Much ado about a wild onion? Maaybe.

  • What's The Federal Government Doing to Our Food? - Spring 2015 Edition

    Right now, the federal government is working on several major pieces of legislation that will have a significant impact on the food we eat. Want to learn more? We've developed the cheat sheet below with summaries of the bills, reasons why they are important for consumers and ways to get involved.

  • How Big Is Your Water Footprint? You'll Be Surprised

    Do you know how much water you really use each day? Drought and water shortages mean we need to use water as productively as possible and cut back on waste. But to get there we first need to know how much water we use every day, and most of us have no idea.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Dill

When most Americans think of dill, pickles come to mind, but the herb was once prized by the ancient Greeks and Romans for its health benefits and magical properties. A staple in the cuisines of Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, North Africa and Russia, dill is actually an incredibly functional, versatile herb and one of the most nutrient dense, low-calorie foods you can eat.

Taste it, Don't Waste it! Fresh Herbs

Want to take your dinner from glum to glam? Add fresh herbs. There is nothing like a tablespoon or two of fragrant greenery to brighten any dish. But what's a cook to do with the rest of the bunch? And what about those stems? Should you chop or toss? Enjoy every last bite of your transformative herbs.

This Week in Eco News - May 1, 2015

Happy Spring! As we welcome a sunnier, warmer weekend, we're mulling a lot of fascinating Eco News. We're excited to share our new Water Footprint Calculator so you can discover how much you're actually using. (You'd be surprised!) And have you heard about William Shatner's bold proposal to solve California's drought problem?

What's The Federal Government Doing to Our Food? - Spring 2015 Edition

Right now, the federal government is working on several major pieces of legislation that will have a significant impact on the food we eat. Want to learn more? We've developed the cheat sheet below with summaries of the bills, reasons why they are important for consumers and ways to get involved.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Bamboo

It's amazing that the giant panda subsists on bamboo almost exclusively - bamboo is not very nutritious, at least not for us. When it comes to munching on this unique and fascinating grass (yes! grass!), it's all about texture and flavor, and knowing how to cook it.

How Big Is Your Water Footprint? You'll Be Surprised

Do you know how much water you really use each day? Drought and water shortages mean we need to use water as productively as possible and cut back on waste. But to get there we first need to know how much water we use every day, and most of us have no idea.

Is the Future of Hockey on Thin Ice?

There is very little that goes untouched by climate change. While not the biggest threat posed by rising global temperatures, the future of hockey itself is at stake. Here, we look at the NHL's noteworthy response: they've become a sustainability leader in professional sports.

This Week in Eco News - April 24, 2015

What an Earth Week! The unofficial theme seemed to be "creative approaches to making our world better" - check out the amazing tale about a brave swimmer of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and the farmers whose vision for our food future is non-GMO - and delicious!

Real Food Right Now and How to Drink It: Tea

Newsflash -- it's tea, not coffee, that is the world's most popular pick me up. In fact, after water, it's the most consumed beverage worldwide. And why wouldn't it be? Tea has deep cultural roots stretching back thousand years, much longer than coffee - and it was the world's first commodity, fueling fortunes and empires.

Food System Recommendations Should Account for More Than Public Health

American agricultural products are used in food, fuel and other goods marketed to consumers around the world. Too often, however, policy makers and businesses overlook the implications of this interconnectivity when making decisions about food consumption here in the US. That's why a systemic approach to policymaking matters!

This Week in Eco News - April 17, 2015

One of the big reasons why we advocate for sustainable food, water and energy? It makes for a safer society. This last week was full of news about the need for testing and conservation to protect us and our resources. Read up on this week's EcoNews to see how the studies and reports of today will lead to a safer tomorrow.

Our Heroes: Karen Washington, Urban Farming Leader

"We must hold true that healthy food is a right for all and not a privilege for some." Meet Karen Washington, an urban farmer from the Bronx, NY. A leader in the urban farming movement, Karen has spent thirty years strengthening New York City's local food system in low-income communities and bolstering black leadership in farming.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Sassafras and Filé

Sassafras is kind of a big deal. Without it the whole history of the US might have played out differently. Also, we wouldn't have root beer or filé gumbo. Depending on whom you ask, sassafras is either a folk remedy or a dangerous carcinogen. We'll leave you to decide: bad seed or beneficial buddy?

This Week in Eco News - April 10, 2015

This past week, everyone has been talking western water - or more accurately, the lack of it. Our team has combed through the drought news and pulled together the best stories about it and its impact for this week's Eco News. Plus: stories about clean energy and more humane treatment of animals!

Food as Medicine: Why Doctors Are Choosing Local, Sustainable Food

While food directly impacts health, the US healthcare system fails to address the importance of food as a preventative tool in personal and public health. Dr. Robert Graham spoke with us about his work to bring a more sustainable approach to medicine, and explained why sustainable food can play a big role in keeping people healthy.

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