• This Week in Eco News - April 24, 2015

    What an Earth Week! The unofficial theme seemed to be "creative approaches to making our world better" - check out the amazing tale about a brave swimmer of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and the farmers whose vision for our food future is non-GMO - and delicious!

  • Real Food Right Now and How to Drink It: Tea

    Newsflash -- it's tea, not coffee, that is the world's most popular pick me up. In fact, after water, it's the most consumed beverage worldwide. And why wouldn't it be? Tea has deep cultural roots stretching back thousand years, much longer than coffee - and it was the world's first commodity, fueling fortunes and empires.

  • Food System Recommendations Should Account for More Than Public Health

    American agricultural products are used in food, fuel and other goods marketed to consumers around the world. Too often, however, policy makers and businesses overlook the implications of this interconnectivity when making decisions about food consumption here in the US. That's why a systemic approach to policymaking matters!

  • Cute Animals Show Us 10 Easy Ways to Help Save the Planet!

    Happy Earth Month! Here is the cutest list o'easy eco tips you've ever seen. Which tip will you use to show our favorite planet some love?

  • Our Heroes: Karen Washington, Urban Farming Leader

    "We must hold true that healthy food is a right for all and not a privilege for some." Meet Karen Washington, an urban farmer from the Bronx, NY. A leader in the urban farming movement, Karen has spent thirty years strengthening New York City's local food system in low-income communities and bolstering black leadership in farming.

This Week in Eco News - April 24, 2015

What an Earth Week! The unofficial theme seemed to be "creative approaches to making our world better" - check out the amazing tale about a brave swimmer of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and the farmers whose vision for our food future is non-GMO - and delicious!

Real Food Right Now and How to Drink It: Tea

Newsflash -- it's tea, not coffee, that is the world's most popular pick me up. In fact, after water, it's the most consumed beverage worldwide. And why wouldn't it be? Tea has deep cultural roots stretching back thousand years, much longer than coffee - and it was the world's first commodity, fueling fortunes and empires.

Food System Recommendations Should Account for More Than Public Health

American agricultural products are used in food, fuel and other goods marketed to consumers around the world. Too often, however, policy makers and businesses overlook the implications of this interconnectivity when making decisions about food consumption here in the US. That's why a systemic approach to policymaking matters!

This Week in Eco News - April 17, 2015

One of the big reasons why we advocate for sustainable food, water and energy? It makes for a safer society. This last week was full of news about the need for testing and conservation to protect us and our resources. Read up on this week's EcoNews to see how the studies and reports of today will lead to a safer tomorrow.

Our Heroes: Karen Washington, Urban Farming Leader

"We must hold true that healthy food is a right for all and not a privilege for some." Meet Karen Washington, an urban farmer from the Bronx, NY. A leader in the urban farming movement, Karen has spent thirty years strengthening New York City's local food system in low-income communities and bolstering black leadership in farming.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Sassafras and Filé

Sassafras is kind of a big deal. Without it the whole history of the US might have played out differently. Also, we wouldn't have root beer or filé gumbo. Depending on whom you ask, sassafras is either a folk remedy or a dangerous carcinogen. We'll leave you to decide: bad seed or beneficial buddy?

This Week in Eco News - April 10, 2015

This past week, everyone has been talking western water - or more accurately, the lack of it. Our team has combed through the drought news and pulled together the best stories about it and its impact for this week's Eco News. Plus: stories about clean energy and more humane treatment of animals!

Food as Medicine: Why Doctors Are Choosing Local, Sustainable Food

While food directly impacts health, the US healthcare system fails to address the importance of food as a preventative tool in personal and public health. Dr. Robert Graham spoke with us about his work to bring a more sustainable approach to medicine, and explained why sustainable food can play a big role in keeping people healthy.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Kiwi

Vibrant (on the inside), juicy and perfectly scoop-able, the kiwi is just as delicious right off the vine as it is baked into a tart. But, did you know that this sweet fruit can be used to firm pie filling or tenderize meat? We didn't either! Read on to learn the history and uses of this fuzzy fruit.

This Week in Eco News - April 3, 2015

While some news this week was pretty dire - "Snowpack? What snowpack?" - we found plenty of inspiring stories about groups doing great sustainable work. The Navajo Nation passed a tax on junk food and soda, the Bullitt Center will be the world's most sustainable venue and passive houses are taking off, which use about a quarter of the energy most houses do. Learn about these groups and others making a difference.

Real Food Right Now and How to Cook It: Spring Roundup

Spring produce may not be the sexiest; juicy fruits like tomatoes, peaches and watermelons are still way down the road, but the end of winter calls for a strong dose of novelty, and luckily, spring has lots of that.

Ocean Acidification Spells Trouble for Shellfish Industry

Mollusks might be nervous: ocean acidification looms. As with rising mercury concentrations in fish, our fossil fueled energy choices are largely to blame. (OK, so maybe mollusks don't have feelings - but we bet you do, oyster-lovers.) What a great reason to support renewable energy!

This Week in Eco News - March 27, 2015

In this week's EcoNews, we feature a lot of stories involving the management of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals. A new study found that common pesticides - like those in RoundUp - might cause antibiotic resistance. And towns are designing wetlands to purify water from pharmaceuticals in sewage.

Real Food Right Now and How to Drink It: Whiskey

Whiskey: the water of life and sweet nectar of the gods. It's the stuff of mint juleps, the Wild West and classic cocktails. For something as American as apple pie, whiskey's roots reach back to Ireland and Scotland. Wait - is it whiskey or whisky? We'll get to the bottom of this intoxicating mystery!

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